Category Archives: Entertainment

Black Women To Host Mayoral

The forum will be moderated by retired educator Edna Varner, who currently works for the Public Education Foundation and is very involved in community service.

For those seeking to hold City Council seats, a second forum will be held Monday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. at Orchard Knob Missionary Baptist Church, 1734 East Third St.

The forum will be moderated by Tom Griscom, former managing editor of the Chattanooga Times Free Press and who currently provides strategic communication consultations with a focus on education, utilities and health care.

Candidates from both races have been extended invitations to participate. As an organization interested in Chattanooga’s future and actively engaged in the city’s political and economic process, NCBW strongly encourages the community to attend both forums.

NCBW is a non-partisan, advocacy organization and does not endorse candidates or contribute to political campaigns. The organization’s role is to provide a means to educate and inform the public, allowing voters to make better, more informed decisions.

The mission of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc. is to advocate on behalf of Black women and girls to promote leadership development and gender equity in the areas of health, education and economic empowerment.  Michele McNeill-Emery is national president and Beverly P. Johnson is president of the local NCBW chapter.

Juried Student Exhibition

The UTC Department of Art 2017 Annual Juried Student Exhibition with Juror Jeffrey S. Morton, professor and chair, Art Department, Covenant College, is now open at the Cress Gallery at UTC.

There will be a Juror’s Public Lecture Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. in Room 201, Derthick Hall, 624 Vine St., followed by the public reception and juror’s awards presentation in the lobby of the Fine Arts Center.

There will be a Juror’s Professionalism Session on Wednesday from 1-2 p.m. in Room 356 Fine Arts Center.

The exhibition runs through Jan. 27, closed Monday, Jan. 16, in observance of the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday.  Gallery hours are 9:30 a.m.–7:30 p.m., Monday-Friday and 1-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.  All events and daily admission are free and open to the public.

A longstanding tradition within the mission of the Cress, this event provides students currently enrolled at all levels of the UTC Department of Art’s curricula the opportunity to submit their work for consideration by an independent jury. Participation in this professional process exemplifies the dedication of these students, the quality of their efforts in studios and classrooms, and their investment in their education from foundations to contemporary trends in art, said officials.

This year’s exhibition is unlike any in the past. It is diverse in content, varied in media and scale, and authentic in nature. Each work is unique. Whether the solution to an assigned problem or the development of an original concept, mastery of skill, embrace of risk, and desire to creatively express an objective are clearly apparent, said officials.

Mr. Morton selected 57 entries from a total of 105 submissions. His selections include two dimensional work created in graphite, charcoal, oil, acrylic, and mixed media on canvas, wood, or paper; sculpture in metal, wood, plaster, concrete, or fiber; analog and digital photography; animation, manipulated and original video; “zines”, artists’ books, posters, and other examples of graphic design. Visitors will find themselves not just observing but also physically interacting, reading and listening.

In his statement, the juror offers an analogy to the wild fires that blanketed the city in smoke on Nov. 7, and the political fallout that surrounded the national election of Nov. 8. “Whatever we call it, the last few months for many of us felt like we had been stumbling our way through a material fog and a political haze,” said Mr. Morton.  “Since art is a part of a particular community and context, our artists felt it too….The works in this collection address how artists not only feel their way through the haze, but more importantly how they work their way through it. They use their work to make sense of their environment and the events that surround them.”

Museum Announces Summer

Full day camps run from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. and include snacks. Campers are asked to bring a peanut-free, brown bag lunch. Admission is $184 for members; $230 for non-members.

June 5 – 9
Street Level: Ages 12 to 14
Young teens break boundaries in this camp when they discover spray paint as a way to make art and create their own graffiti work.

June 12 – 16
C-ART-ography: Ages nine to 11
“X marks the spot” for treasure hunters and geography lovers alike when they create artistic maps and chart a new course for artistic adventure.

June 19 – 23
Move It, Bend It, Shape It, Sculpt It: Ages six to eight
Yoga and art become one when campers make their bodies into living sculptures and then create artistic sculptures with other media.

June 26 – 30
Art2 D2 Squared: Ages nine to 11
Imagination meets invention when campers meld art and robotics to create something truly distinctive.

July 10 – 14
Art Detectives: Ages six to eight
Campers uncover the mysterious histories of art and artists and then create their own works filled with clues and mystery.

July 17 – 21
Mixed with Media: Ages nine to 11
Go viral with art this week when campers learn more about messages in art and in social media. Participants will create their own mixed media works blending technology and traditional media to make their own viral sensation.

Back From A Great Cruise

Cruises are fun vacations, filled with great food, some sunshine, and a little partying. But, if you are going on a cruise for some great music, you may want to pick a “themed cruise” that specializes in music, such as a blues cruise or a classic rock cruise.

The music on a “standard” cruise leaves a bit to be desired in most instances. There are some exceptions, of course, but for the most part, the entertainment didn’t come close to measuring up to our local talent right here in beautiful Chattanooga.

The one exception is the piano bar. Almost every cruise I have been on has a good piano bar performer. It’s a fun atmosphere in the piano bar room, with the performer taking requests and showing off a huge repertoire of songs.

Often, the crowd sings along with the performer. We even have a piano bar performer from Chattanooga that is the best I have ever seen – David Anthony. He performs aboard Holland America ships.

I also like the steel drum performers. I call it atmosphere music. It kind of makes one feel like you are in the islands. (Okay, you are in the islands, but this really adds to it…lol)

The bar bands are kind of cheesy – not even close to the talent of our cover bands here at home. I suppose if you drink enough alcohol, they may sound better, but trust me when I say they aren’t in the same league. The trend onboard is to using backing tracks to try and make the band sound better, but they aren’t fooling this old dog.

All in all, cruises are great vacations and are a real value. The entertainment is so-so, but the scenery and atmosphere is fantastic. For about $100 a day, you get a “hotel room” on board, all the food you could possibly swallow, and some decent fun and a great view! I mentioned a “themed cruise” earlier. Kid Rock, Delbert McClinton, and many more big name performers have their own themed cruises. If you are there for the music, consider one of those.
Bob Payne grew up in Chattanooga and graduated from Baylor School. He is the Entertainment Editor for the Chattanoogan.com and assistant talent buyer for Riverbend Festival.

Pushes Shoppers Out Of The Way

Chattanooga Police officers working at the Hamilton Place Mall were made aware of a suspect attempting to use a stolen credit card to make a purchase.

Officers gave loud verbal commands for the suspect to stop. The suspect did not comply and instead attempted to flee by running. An officer working another area of the mall assisted by approaching the suspect and was able to slow his attempt to flee.

While apprehending the suspect officers discovered an object under his clothing. Once he was in custody, officers removed the object, which turned out to be a handgun. The suspect was transported to the Hamilton County Jail without incident.

 

CBL/Hamilton Place Mall has sign placed around the mall banning the carry of firearms on property.

 

Rogers is charged with fraudulent use of a credit card, evading arrest, resisting arrest, possession of a firearm during the commission of a crime, two counts of possession of a firearm with intent to go armed, disorderly conduct, reckless endangerment, and carrying weapons in a public area.

Often, the crowd sings along with the performer. We even have a piano bar performer from Chattanooga that is the best I have ever seen – David Anthony. He performs aboard Holland America ships.

I also like the steel drum performers. I call it atmosphere music. It kind of makes one feel like you are in the islands. (Okay, you are in the islands, but this really adds to it…lol)

The bar bands are kind of cheesy – not even close to the talent of our cover bands here at home. I suppose if you drink enough alcohol, they may sound better, but trust me when I say they aren’t in the same league. The trend onboard is to using backing tracks to try and make the band sound better, but they aren’t fooling this old dog.

All in all, cruises are great vacations and are a real value. The entertainment is so-so, but the scenery and atmosphere is fantastic. For about $100 a day, you get a “hotel room” on board, all the food you could possibly swallow, and some decent fun and a great view! I mentioned a “themed cruise” earlier. Kid Rock, Delbert McClinton, and many more big name performers have their own themed cruises. If you are there for the music, consider one of those.
Bob Payne grew up in Chattanooga and graduated from Baylor School. He is the Entertainment Editor for the Chattanoogan.com and assistant talent buyer for Riverbend Festival.

Donation To United Way Of Greater

Food City officials presented a check totaling $10,000 to the United Way of Greater Chattanooga on Friday.  The check presentation took place at the Red Bank Food City, following the store’s grand reopening remodel celebration.

“Food City is proud to be a long standing United Way corporate partner,” said Mickey Blazer, executive vice president of Store Operations for Food City’s Knoxville and Chattanooga divisions.  “United Way is making great strides in improving education, health, financial stability, and support – and contributions remain local and benefit our friends and neighbors throughout our community.
Food City also partnered with United Way of Greater Chattanooga to host their first annual Celebrity Bagging event in the Chattanooga market area.  The event raised over $16,000 to benefit the Woodmore families impacted by the tragic bus accident.

The forum will be moderated by retired educator Edna Varner, who currently works for the Public Education Foundation and is very involved in community service.

For those seeking to hold City Council seats, a second forum will be held Monday, Feb. 6, at 6 p.m. at Orchard Knob Missionary Baptist Church, 1734 East Third St.

The forum will be moderated by Tom Griscom, former managing editor of the Chattanooga Times Free Press and who currently provides strategic communication consultations with a focus on education, utilities and health care.

Candidates from both races have been extended invitations to participate. As an organization interested in Chattanooga’s future and actively engaged in the city’s political and economic process, NCBW strongly encourages the community to attend both forums.

NCBW is a non-partisan, advocacy organization and does not endorse candidates or contribute to political campaigns. The organization’s role is to provide a means to educate and inform the public, allowing voters to make better, more informed decisions.

The mission of the National Coalition of 100 Black Women, Inc. is to advocate on behalf of Black women and girls to promote leadership development and gender equity in the areas of health, education and economic empowerment.  Michele McNeill-Emery is national president and Beverly P. Johnson is president of the local NCBW chapter.

Presents Provocative Percussion

The Shaking Ray Levi Society will present Provocative Percussion with Tim Feeney and Erik Gehrke and special guests David D. Dunn (bass clarinet) and Evan Lipson (double bass).  The show will be Sunday, Jan. 22, at Wayne-O-Rama, 1800 Rossville Ave., #108.  The performance begins at 6:30 p.m. and doors will open at 6 p.m.

Admission is $12 at the door and $8 for students.

Review for Provocative Percussion:

The Wayne-O-Rama Concert Series continues its momentum of bringing absolutely unique and unusual music performances with its second concert, featuring a pair of adventurous percussionists, Tim Feeney and Erik Gehrke, with singular, visionary drum explorations that go beyond tradition in astounding ways.

Set 1: Erik Gehrke’s solo drum arrangement of his original composition “November 25, 1863,” commissioned for the Sherman Reservation dedication, expressing “the carnage and pathos of warfare.”
Set 2: Tim Feeney solo percussion performance
Set 3: Tim Feeney, David D. Dunn (bass clarinet) and Evan Lipson (double bass) playing an improvised set

Opportunity To Work With LA Based Director

Mr. Kussman is an actor/writer/director and the audition schedule is being adjusted a bit to take advantage of this opportunity.

There will be only one night of auditions (not the usual two); the auditions will be cold readings with no preparation necessary.

Scheduling note: Actors will need to be available for rehearsals the evening of Thursday, Feb. 9, and be flexible for evening rehearsals the week of April 17.

A synopsis of EXIT 136:

It’s 1998, and a snowstorm has stranded six mismatched characters in a run-down truck stop. A sick young man makes an unlikely friend, a trucker struggles to keep his son, and a truck stop regular bemoans a past action for which he cannot forgive himself. Tensions rise as secrets are revealed and alliances betrayed, keeping audiences guessing until the end.

For more information, contact Kim Jackson at execdirector@theatrecentre.com.

Following are available roles for Exit 136:

Michelle Spinelli (a waitress, late 30s)
Barney Ledbetter (a customer, 60s)
Man (a customer, 40)
Roy Wilkerson (a trucker, 30s)
Anita Rains (a customer, 50s)
Jeff Rains (her son, late 20s)
Various radio voices
Setting: A run-down truck stop in East Tennessee
Time: Late December, 1998

Gallery will feature the original work

Segmented or bleeding, but invariably multifaceted, Kate Wilson’s paintings in gouache, mixed media, and oil prioritize form. In Wilson’s more figurative works, planes of bodies and faces are reduced to vibrant patches of color. Meanwhile, each fluid abstract work layers and teases out ghostly forms, maintaining depth even at their haziest. Wilson strictly delineates colors in some areas, while allowing the pigments to seep outward into fuzzy rings in others.  The result is work that flows with motion and light where the carefully applied tones meet and contrast. Wilson finds inspiration in these dichotomies between control and entropy, sometimes taking a work to one extreme or the other and sometimes applying both techniques to the same canvas, achieving a focused balance. The forms in each painting, combined with the soft pinks, blues and neutrals that make up so much of Wilson’s work, create undeniably serene images.

Originally from Birmingham, Alabama, Kate Wilson lives and works in Los Angeles. Travel, femininity, and spiritual curiosity inform Wilson’s work, so that each painting becomes emblematic of the artist’s personal experience.

The Many Worlds in “Plurality of Expression”

Agora Gallery is pleased to present Plurality of Expression, a new group exhibition highlighting the incredible diversity of visual language that the human mind is capable of creating. Seven artists are featured, among them painters, sculptors, photographers, and interdisciplinary artists. The group hails from a wide range of places including Peru, Romania, and Canada, and their far-flung origins influence their work in unexpected ways. Instead of any one artist creating pieces in a traditional or characteristic style of their home, this group represents the ever-increasing globalization of our world. Each artist shows knowledge of old and new techniques, and local and foreign aesthetics. Influences are cherished, but they are also interrogated and pushed further. Information travels quickly in the art world.

The strength of Plurality of Expression lies in just how different its featured artists are. One painter creates meticulously realistic tableaux of utterly fantastic landscapes – a road floating over an endless sky, or an egg that has sprouted its own feather. Another artist creates digital photographs exploring the nature of femininity through wondrously tactile liquids and fabrics. Yet another makes jewel-toned paintings of flat, serpentine figuresFind Article, and another makes infinitely layered visions of the cosmos.

Sneak Attack On Dual Taxpayers

Now Mr. Haynes wishes to farm out the cost of reappraisal to individual cities for their residents. This amounts to nothing more than a cost shift out of his office to city taxpayers that were already paying the expense through their county taxes. So taxpayers of Signal Mountain, Red Bank, Lakesite, Soddy Daisy, Collegedale, Chattanooga, East Ridge, Walden, Ridgeside, Lookout Mountain, please consider this. Your last property appraisal was paid from your Hamilton County taxes. If the Hamilton County Commissioners approve the request to cost shift the reappraisal fees to all municipalities and towns, your next appraisal will ding you twice for one job.

The only fair way to fund Hamilton County property appraisals is the way it has always been done. All those that own property in Hamilton County should be appraised and billed equally from the taxes Hamilton County already collects and that all Hamilton County taxpayers already pay. Keep in mind the appraiser’ s office does not suggest any reduction in Hamilton County taxes to those that would be paying a second time after the tax shift occurs.  The appraiser well knows it would be illegal to reduce taxes for some county taxpayers, even if the cost responsibility was shifted. The net effect of his proposal would allow him to shift the expense while maintaining the same revenue stream. What a sweet deal for the appraiser’s office.

This is yet another example of how those living in towns or cities, which happen to also lie in Hamilton County, are double tax abused. If this outrageous expense dumping is approved, the abused would like Mr. Haynes to explain who will pay for the appraisals for those living in the unincorporated portions of Hamilton County. We know the unincorporated taxpayers will not be paying a second portion for their same tax appraisals, so how will he be treating all county citizens equally and fairly?  While the assessor’s office is financially supported by all citizens that pay county taxes, the unincorporated folks will feel no additional pain from the expense shifting. Not fair.

We can be certain that when someone tries to defend this sneak attack, they will mention that the same property assessments are used to compute tax rates for both city and county properties. It has always been this way for good reason. Assuming his county appraisers use a standard market value basis for appraising (and they do), there is no reason for the city and county to separately appraise the same property twice, because the state dictates all assessments must occur in the same year regardless of where in the state the property is located. Common sense has always driven the process.

Mr. Haynes, we dual taxpayers understand what you are doing and we do not appreciate this new idea. Paying a double expense for the single task of property reappraisals is not worth the benefit of an offer to extend your office hours from 4-5 p.m. Many of us cannot recall the last time we visited your office, unless it was to protest an inflated appraisal. We would encourage you to rethink this ill-conceived move. We would remind you that the majority of county voters, who will be paying the double expense, reside in the cities and towns of Hamilton County. According to the latest U.S. Census data 2014-2015, the collective majority of dual county and city-town taxpaying voters constitutes about 62 percent of Hamilton County residents. It’s a large bloc of voters to discriminate against. Don’t forget commercial property owners. Please understand the magnitude of all the frustrated double-taxed people.